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The Wall Street Journal had an article advising homeowners who were upside down on their mortgage to just throw in the towel and walk away from their mortgage. Here’s the abridged version:

Millions of Americans are now deeply underwater on their mortgage. If you’re among them, you need to stop living in a dream world and give serious thought to walking away from the debt.

No, you shouldn’t feel bad about it, and you shouldn’t feel guilty. The lenders would do the same to you—in a heartbeat. You need to put yourself and your family’s finances first.

If you are reluctant to give up on “your” home, realize that it isn’t “yours.” If you are in negative equity, it’s the bank’s home. You’re just renting it. And right now you may be paying way above market rates. You need to be ruthless about your cash flow.

Still, when it comes to the idea of walking away from debts, many people are held back by a sense of morality. They feel it’s wrong to abandon their obligations. They don’t want to be a deadbeat.

Your instincts, while honorable, are leading you astray.

The economy is fundamentally amoral.

Whether we like it or not, walking away from debts is as American as apple pie. Companies file for bankruptcy all the time, and their lenders eat the losses. Executives and investors pocketed millions from the likes of Washington Mutual, Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns when the going was good. They didn’t have to give back one cent of that money when the companies went into bankruptcy.

Wow, I’m speechless. It seems the greed of Wall Street has permeated down to the lower rungs of society and it’s perfectly okay to socialize your debts and losses. (By socializing, I mean the bank or taxpayer or a large group of people who are not affiliated to you end up paying for your debts/losses/mistakes/greed). Apparently its as American as apple pie. Is this the change I didn’t vote for? If everyone in all sections of society thinks its perfectly okay to default on your obligations, logically, the next question is

How much longer until the US Government starts defaulting on its debts?

Of course, the US Government cannot default, since it can keep printing US Dollars to pay for its debt. Which it is already doing. The only problem is that this increases the number of dollars in circulation and causes the currency to devalue. Sooner or later, we’re going to see a large of amount of inflation. No we may not see hyperinflation like Brazil or Zimbabwe, but we sure might see 10-12% inflation for a few years.

But 12% inflation for only 6 years would cause the price of everything to double. If you don’t think that’s possible, just look at a country which isn’t currently in deep recession, like India. Inflation in India is currently running at 9%. And over the past decade it has been running at a similar rate.

So what’s the effect on the average Indian? Highly skilled workers saw their salaries jump 10 times, while salaries for unskilled labor is up about 5 times. So everyone is better off, right? Not exactly, people living on fixed incomes basically got screwed as prices for everything else went up 5-10 times as well. It was great if you owned real assets like real estate, gold and to some extent stocks, but terrible if you owned bonds or cash. Just make sure your investments are tailored towards those investments that happen to do well during inflationary times.